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2020 DEMOCRATIC PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES ON TAXES AND INVESTMENTS

Explore each candidates position on various tax reform issues or toggle the switch below to compare two candidates. This site was last updated 7/18/19.

Bennet
Biden
Booker
Bullock
Buttigieg
Castro
De Blasio
Delaney
Gabbard
Gillibrand
Harris
Inslee
Klobuchar
Moulton
Messam
O'Rourke
Ryan
Sanders
Steyer
Warren
Williamson
Yang
Michael Bennet ON TAXES AND INVESTMENTS
Bennet

Vote on the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA): Voted No

The TCJA (H.R. 1), also known as the Trump-GOP tax cuts, will cost $1.9 trillion over 10 years. The tax cuts heavily favor corporations and the wealthy.

Source: Roll Call Vote

Tax Cuts and Jobs Act

“I think the next Democratic president — I hope that it's me — will go and sign the bill reversing the Trump tax cuts in a county in the South where 70% of the people voted for Donald Trump, to be able to show them the math and say this is why you should be with us, not with him.”

Source: CSPAN starts at 8:01

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: About $1.5 trillion

Source: JCT/ATF (TCJA 10-year tax cut lost about $1.5 trillion -- $1.9 trillion counting interest)

Child Tax Credit (CTC)

Bennet is the lead sponsor of the "American Family Act of 2019" (S. 690). It would significantly expand the Child Tax Credit (CTC), increasing maximum payments from $2,000 a year today to $3,000 for children between the ages of 6 and 16 and to $3,600 a year for children 5 and under. Benefits would be paid monthly, in advance, so families could better cover their living costs. Four million children could be lifted out of poverty.

Source: S. 690, Vox

Cost Over 10 Years: $105 billion (1 year)

Source: ITEP

Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), Child Tax Credit (CTC)

Bennet is a leading sponsor of the "Working Families Tax Relief Act of 2019" (S. 1139). It would expand the EITC by 25% for families with children, make the CTC fully refundable and add a Young Child Tax Credit for children under 6. The bill would also substantially strengthen the EITC for childless workers. “It would improve the economic well-being of 46 million low- and moderate-income households with 114 million people.”

Source: S. 1138, CBPP

Cost Over 10 Years: $99 billion
Source: ITEP

Payroll Tax for Paid Leave

Bennet is cosponsoring the “FAMILY Act” (S. 463), which will fund 12 weeks of paid family leave by assessing a 0.2% tax on workers’ wages, to be split evenly between employer and employee. Both shares together would amount to less than $4 per worker per week, on average.

Source: S. 463, Vox

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

PAYS FOR

Twelve weeks of guaranteed paid leave, either for the birth of a child, illness or to take care of a relative. It would pay out 66% of workers’ salaries, including at least $250 per month to each worker, capped at $4,000 per person per month.

Source: S. 463, Vox

Joe Biden ON TAXES AND INVESTMENTS
Biden

TCJA Reform & Capital Gains Taxes To Help Pay For Healthcare & College

Biden will reverse the TCJA tax cuts for the wealthy by restoring the 39.6% top marginal tax rate, up from 37%. Biden will also equalize the top tax rates on investment income and wages and salaries by requiring those who make over $1 million to pay a top rate of 39.6%, instead of the 20% rate on capital gains they currently enjoy. Biden also suggests he will eliminate the stepped-up basis loophole, which allows taxpayers to avoid paying any taxes on the growth in value of assets such as stocks if they are passed on to heirs of estates before they are sold.

Source: Biden for President Health Care Plan, C-SPAN (starts at 23:45)

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: $139 billion from 39.6% tax rate; other estimates not available

Source: JCT

PAYS FOR

Biden will invest $750 billion over 10 years to help more working families afford healthcare. He will expand tax credits that help people buy health insurance under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). He will also provide premium-free access to a new public option under the ACA for 4.9 million lower-income families in 14 states that did not expand Medicaid under the ACA. Biden also suggests using the revenue saved from eliminating the stepped-up basis loophole to pay for free community college for between 6 and 9 million students.

Sources: CNN, Biden for President Health Care Plan, C-SPAN (starts at 23:45)

TCJA Repeal & Corporate Taxes to Address Climate Change

“The Biden [Climate] plan will be paid for by reversing the excesses of the Trump tax cuts for corporations, reducing incentives for tax havens, evasion, and outsourcing, ensuring corporations pay their fair share, closing other loopholes in our tax code that rewards wealth not work, and ending subsidies for fossil fuels.”

Separately, Biden said he will raise the corporate tax rate from 21% to 28%, which was the rate proposed by the Obama administration when there was a 35% corporate tax rate.

Sources: Biden for President, New York Post

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: $675 billion by raising corporate tax rate

Source: CBO/JCT/ATF (pp. 39-40)

PAYS FOR

These tax increases will pay for “Joe Biden’s Plan for a Clean Energy Revolution and Environmental Justice,” which will make a $1.7 trillion federal investment in clean energy programs with the goal of reaching 100% clean energy by 2050.

Source: Biden for President

Cory Booker ON TAXES AND INVESTMENTS
Booker

Vote on the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA): Voted No

The TCJA (H.R. 1), also known as the Trump-GOP tax cuts, will cost $1.9 trillion over 10 years. The tax cuts heavily favor corporations and the wealthy.

Source: Roll Call Vote

Capital Gains Taxes to Fund “Baby Bonds” and EITC

Booker has said two different things about capital-gains tax rates. He will end the “preferential tax treatment of capital gains investment income that overwhelmingly favors the wealthiest Americans, because income from selling stocks and other investments should be taxed the same as income from work.” This suggests he will raise the top capital gains rate from 20% to 37%. But Booker's American Opportunities Account Act (S. 3766) proposes to raise the capital gains rate to 24.2%. This bill also taxes capital gains at death or upon gifting.

Sources: Fox News, S. 3766

Revenue Raised over 10 Years: Not Available

PAYS FOR

Booker has proposed two uses for the new capital-gains tax revenue. His legislation (S. 3766) will establish a savings account, or “baby bonds,” of $1,000 at birth for every child, with additional yearly deposits of up to $2,000 depending on family income, until a child reaches the age of 18. This will cost $60 billion over 10 years per Booker. Separately Booker has proposed the Rise Credit, which will nearly double EITC income eligibility, from $54,000 to $90,000 for a married couple. That will expand the credit for joint filers with three or more children by 25% -- from roughly $6,500 (IRS data) to about $8,000. For childless adults he expands the credit from about $500 to $4,000 -- an 800% increase. The one-year cost of these tax credits is $250 billion.

Sources: Axios, NBC News, IRS, ITEP

Estate Tax to Fund Baby Bonds and a Renter’s Tax Credit

Booker’s American Opportunity Accounts Act (S. 3766) will restore estate-tax exemption amounts to 2009 levels and raise rates. The amount of estates exempt from taxation will decrease from $11 million for individuals ($22 million for couples) under the TCJA to $3.5 million and $7 million. The current 40% tax rate will increase to 45% and apply to estates worth up to $10 million. The portion of estates from $10-$50 million will be taxed at 50% and above $50 million will be taxed at 65%. It will also establish an annual cumulative limit of $50,000 on tax-exempt gifts and restrict the use of certain trusts. This reform will affect 0.5% of estates.

Sources: S. 3766, Bessemer Trust, Tax Policy Center

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: About $300 billion

Source: ATF (see Sen. Sanders' proposal)

PAYS FOR

Booker appears to have proposed two uses for this revenue: “baby bonds” savings accounts and housing. His American Opportunity Accounts Act (S. 3766) will establish a savings account of $1,000 at birth for every child, with additional yearly deposits of up to $2,000 depending on family income, until a child reaches the age of 18. Booker estimates the costs at $60 billion over 10 years.

Sources: The Hill, Sen. Booker, Vox

Cory’s Plan To Provide Safe, Affordable Housing For All Americans would provide a refundable tax credit that would cover the difference between 30% of a person’s pre-tax income and the fair-market rent in their neighborhood. Booker estimates this plan will cost $134 billion annually and help 57 million Americans, including 17 million children.

Sources: Booker Medium post, NYT

Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), Child Tax Credit (CTC)

Booker is cosponsoring two bills that will expand these working family tax credits. The “Working Families Tax Relief Act of 2019” (S. 1138) will expand the EITC by 25% for families with children, makes the CTC fully refundable and adds a Young Child Tax Credit for children under 6. The bill will also substantially strengthen the EITC for childless workers. The “American Family Act of 2019” (S. 690) will significantly increase the Child Tax Credit, bringing maximum payments from $2,000 a year today to $3,000 for children between the ages of 6 and 16 and to $3,600 a year for children 5 and under.

Sources: S. 1138, CBPP, S. 690, Vox

Cost Over 10 Years: $99 billion for EITC (1 year) and $105 billion (1 year)

Source: ITEP

Payroll Tax for Paid Leave

Booker is cosponsoring the “FAMILY Act” (S. 463), which will fund 12 weeks of paid family leave by assessing a 0.2% tax on workers’ wages, to be split evenly between employer and employee. Both shares together would amount to less than $4 per worker per week, on average.

Source: S. 463, Vox

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

PAYS FOR

Twelve weeks of guaranteed paid leave, either for the birth of a child, illness or to take care of a relative. It would pay out 66% of workers’ salaries, including at least $250 per month to each worker, capped at $4,000 per person per month.

Source: S. 463, Vox

Carbon Tax

“A federal price on carbon should be one part of a comprehensive response by the federal government to the threat of climate change."

Source: NYT

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Revenue neutral

PAYS FOR

"The proceeds should be paid out as a dividend in a progressive way that ensures that our climate policies are also reducing inequality and not burdening everyday families.”

Source: NYT

Polluter Taxes

Booker will reinstate and triple the Superfund Tax on chemical and oil companies, and double the fees on coal-mine operators. The money will be used to clean up Superfund sites.

Source: CORY 2020

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

Steve Bullock ON TAXES AND INVESTMENTS
Bullock

Tax Cuts & Jobs Act (TCJA)

Bullock criticized the TCJA as governor, arguing that “[TCJA] poses significant problems” for the Montana state budget and “disproportionately favors the wealthiest Americans and corporations at the expense of Montana workers and families.”

Source: Missoula Current, Great Falls Tribune

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

Individual Taxes, Capital Gains Taxes & Corporate Taxes

“I think you could look at a 28 percent [corporate tax rate] [and] still be competitive and close loopholes and turn around especially on the first top four brackets. Take it up another three points.” Bullock also supports taxing capital gains at the same rate as ordinary income.

Source: Pod Save America at 44:51

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: $675 billion by raising corporate tax rate

Source: CBO/JCT/ATF (pp. 39-40)

Pete Buttigieg ON TAXES AND INVESTMENTS
Buttigieg

TCJA, Wealth Tax, Financial Transaction Tax

Buttigieg supports reversing the TCJA’s tax cuts for high earners, and would impose a wealth tax and a financial transaction tax but has not provided any details.

Source: Los Angeles Times

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

Individual Taxes

Buttigieg says he will consider raising the top marginal tax rate from 37% to 49.9999%.

Source: NYT

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

Corporate Taxes

Buttigieg supports single sales factor apportionment, which would tax multinational corporations based on the volume and country location of their sales to limit tax avoidance.

Source: You Tube, Tax Policy Center

Cost Over 10 Years: Not Available

Financial Transaction Tax

“I’m interested also — if we could find the right way to implement it and the devil’s in the details — in a financial transactions tax. Because you see preposterous levels of wealth sometimes being created around these millisecond differences in financial transactions that nobody can explain to us whether it adds any actual real value to the economy.”
Source: CNBC

Revenue raised over 10 years: Not Available

Carbon Tax

Buttigieg says “[w]e have to have a carbon tax.” but has provided no details.

Source: NYT

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Appears to be revenue neutral as he has said he wants to return the revenue "right back to the American people."

Source: NYT

Julián Castro ON TAXES AND INVESTMENTS
Castro

Individual Taxes For Medicare for All

Castro has no specific plan but says he “can support folks at the top paying for fair share” and supports the principle behind Rep. Ocasio-Cortez's suggestion that the tax rate on income above $10 million should be as high as 70%. He wants to use the revenue for Medicare for All.

Source: ABC News

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

Carbon Tax for Renewable Energy Investments

Castro says “[t]he United States needs a federally mandated price on carbon..."

Source: NYT

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

PAYS FOR

Investing in renewable energy and compensation of vulnerable communities for the impact of climate change and the policies meant to address it (this last statement presumably meaning tax credits).

Source: NYT

Tax Credits for Lead Safety

Castro supports Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse’s Home Lead Safety Tax Credit Act (S. 1575), which will provide a refundable tax credit of up to $3,000 to cover half the cost of cleaning up lead hazards.

Source: S. 1575, Julian Castro

Cost Over 10 Years: Not Available

Bill De Blasio ON TAXES AND INVESTMENTS
De Blasio

Wealth, Individual, Capital Gains & Inheritance Taxes

De Blasio proposes an “Extreme Wealth Tax” of 1% on households with wealth between $10 to $25 million, a 2% tax between $25 to $100 million, and a 3% tax in excess of $100 million. De Blasio will raise the top tax rate from 37% to 40% for individuals earning under $1 million and create two new tax brackets for the very wealthy -- 50% on income between $1-$2 million and 60% on income over $2 million. De Blasio will equalize income and capital gains tax rates, in addition to closing other “loopholes that allow wealthy investors to avoid taxation.” De Blasio will replace the estate tax, paid by the wealthiest estates, with an income tax on inheritances of $1 million or more.

Source: Fair Share Tax Plan

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: $5-6 trillion

Source: Fair Share Tax Plan

Corporate Taxes & Bank Tax

De Blasio will restore the 35% corporate income tax rate, equalize offshore and domestic corporate income tax rates, and institute a “strong Corporate Alternative Minimum Tax.” De Blasio will place a 0.15% tax on the uninsured liabilities of “big banks.”

Source: Fair Share Tax Plan

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: $1.3 trillion (35% corporate tax rate); $103 billion (bank tax)

Source: Fair Share Tax Plan

Business & Real Estate Taxes

De Blasio will repeal the TCJA 20% deduction for pass-through businesses and strengthen the Alternative Minimum Tax, which “prevents the rich from using excessive deductions and exclusions to minimize or even eliminate their tax bills.” De Blasio will repeal real estate tax breaks concerning pass-through and dividend exemptions, as well as exemptions from interest deduction limits and the like-kind exchange repeal.

Source: Fair Share Tax Plan

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: $425 billion (AMT); $387 billion (pass-through repeal); $67 billon (real estate)
Source: Fair Share Tax Plan

Financial Transaction Tax

De Blasio supports a financial transaction tax of 0.2% on the trading of stocks, bonds and derivatives.

Source: Fair Share Tax Plan

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: At least $777 billion; full amount not available

Sources: CBO

CEO Pay Taxes

To reduce the gap in pay between CEOs and their employees, De Blasio will create a “Pay Ratio Tax” that will increase corporate taxes from 0.5% for pay ratios greater than 100 to 1, to 3% for pay ratios exceeding 400 to 1. De Blasio will also close the “CEO bonus loophole” that allows corporations to deduct stock option payments to executives, as well as the “stock options loophole,” which allows corporations to calculate the cost of a stock option differently for compensation and tax liability purposes.

Source: Fair Share Tax Plan

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: $80 billion (pay ratio); $45 billion (bonus and stock options loopholes)

Source: Fair Share Tax Plan

Close Healthcare Tax Loopholes

De Blasio will “prevent business owners from mischaracterizing the nature of their income in order to dodge taxes that support Medicare and the Affordable Care Act.”

Source: Fair Share Tax Plan

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: $163 billion to $199 billion
Source: CBO, CBO

John Delaney ON TAXES AND INVESTMENTS
Delaney

Vote on the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA): Voted No

The TCJA (H.R. 1), also known as the Trump-GOP tax cuts, will cost $1.9 trillion over 10 years. The tax cuts heavily favor corporations and the wealthy.

Source: Roll Call Vote

Vote to Make the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act Permanent: Voted No

This legislation (H.R. 6760) would have made the Trump-GOP tax cuts that affect individuals permanent; currently they expire at the end of 2025. Those tax cuts would have heavily favored the wealthy.

Source: Roll Call Vote

TCJA Repeal, Capital Gains Taxes, & Robot Taxes

Delaney proposes “raising capital gains tax rates on high income earners, repealing the Trump tax cuts for high income earners, and creating a new Robot Tax on job-displacing capital investments.” Regarding investment taxes he has said he wants to “synchroniz[e] capital gains tax rates with ordinary income tax rates. We do not need a lower capital gains rate; that is an outdated incentive and contributes meaningfully to the structural unfairness in the tax code as investors pay lower taxes than workers,”

Source: John Delaney's Plan For Living Wage, Washington Post

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

PAYS FOR

Delaney’s Workers’ Tax Credit, which he says will nearly double participation in the EITC program -- providing assistance to 14 million more households, including a dramatic expansion in eligibility among childless households. Benefits will increase by $1,500 for low-income households with and without children.

Source: John Delaney's Plan For Living Wage

Surtax on Individual Taxes for Pre-K Education

Delaney’s Early Learning Act of 2017 (H.R. 3466) will impose a 1.5% surtax on an individual’s adjusted gross income over $500,000.

Source: Delaney for President

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

PAYS FOR

Delaney’s bill would create an Early Education Trust Fund to guarantee access to pre-K education for all four-year olds.

Source: Delaney for President

Corporate Taxes for Infrastructure

Delaney will increase the corporate tax rate from 21% to 27%.

Source: Delaney for President

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: About $550 billion
Source: CBO/ATF

PAYS FOR

Delaney's infrastructure plan. It will increase funding for the existing Highway Trust Fund, as well as create new funding mechanisms, including an Infrastructure Bank, Climate Infrastructure Fund and five funds targeting specific infrastructure needs that would match federal funds with state and local contributions.

Source: Delaney for President

Carbon Tax

Delaney supports a "Carbon Fee and Dividend" that taxes carbon beginning at $15 per metric ton of CO2 (or equivalent) and increases $10 each year.

Source: NYT

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Revenue Neutral

PAYS FOR

Delaney’s carbon tax would be "return[ed] 100 percent to the taxpayers with an option to invest the dividend into a tax-advantaged savings account like a 529 or retirement account."

Source: NYT

Gas Tax for Infrastructure

Delaney will “[increase] the federal gas tax to account for inflation since the last increase.” The gas tax is currently 18.3 cents per gallon; adjusting it for inflation since the last increase in 1993 would have made it about 51 cents in 2018.

Source: Delaney for President, ITEP

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

PAYS FOR

Delaney's infrastructure plan. It would increase funding for the existing Highway Trust Fund, as well as create new funding mechanisms, including an Infrastructure Bank, Climate Infrastructure Fund and five funds targeting specific infrastructure needs that would match federal funds with state and local contributions.

Source: Delaney for President

Pharmaceutical Tax

“To address the unfair cost differential between the U.S. and other {developed] countries, the government would institute a 100% excise tax, levied on the pharmaceutical company on the difference between the average price of a drug sold in the U.S. and the price of that drug in similarly economically developed countries.”

Source: John Delaney's Plan to Lower Prescription Drug Prices

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not available

Tulsi Gabbard ON TAXES AND INVESTMENTS
Gabbard

Vote on the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA): Voted No

The TCJA (H.R. 1), also known as the Trump-GOP tax cuts, will cost $1.9 trillion over 10 years. The tax cuts heavily favor corporations and the wealthy.

Source: Roll Call Vote

Vote to Make the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act Permanent: Did Not Vote

This legislation (H.R. 6760) would have made the Trump-GOP tax cuts that affect individuals permanent; currently they expire at the end of 2025. Those tax cuts would have heavily favored the wealthy.

Source: Roll Call Vote

Tax Cuts and Jobs Act

“Gabbard slammed Trump’s tax reform bill, describing it as a ‘failure’ that resulted in ‘tax giveaways to corporations’ while ‘adding $1.5 trillion to the national debt and not translating to relief for working Americans or benefiting small business.’”

Source: Business Insider

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

Individual, Capital Gains & Financial Transaction Taxes for Healthcare

Gabbard cosponsored the “Expanded & Improved Medicare For All Act” (H.R. 676) from 2018, which would increase income taxes on the wealthiest 5%, enact a modest and progressive payroll tax and self-employment tax, institute a modest tax on unearned income, and place a small tax on stock and bond transactions.

Source: H.R. 676

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

Individual Taxes, Corporate Taxes

Gabbard wants to raise taxes on the wealthy and close corporate tax loopholes but provides no details.

Source: Business Insider

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

Financial Transaction Tax

Gabbard is cosponsoring the "Inclusive Prosperity Act of 2019" (H.R. 2923), which will tax stock trades at a rate of 0.5%, bond trades at 0.1%, and derivatives trades at 0.005% -- adding $5 to the cost of every $1,000 in stock traded, much less to other trades.

Source: H.R. 2923

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Up to $2.2 trillion

Source: Pollin, Heintz and Herndon

Fossil Fuel Tax Breaks & Climate Change

Gabbard was the lead sponsor of the “Off Fossil Fuels for a Better Future Act (OFF Act)” (H.R. 3671) in 2017. It would end special tax breaks for the fossil-fuels industry and close an offshore tax loophole.

Sources: H.R. 3671, Food & Water Watch

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

PAYS FOR

Low-income weatherization and retrofit assistance, electric vehicle rebate program for consumers, extension of tax credits for wind and solar energy, an "Equitable Transition Fund" to compensate communities for costs of moving to renewable energy, and retraining of fossil-fuel industry workers.

Sources: NYT, H.R. 3671

Child Tax Credit (CTC)

Gabbard is cosponsoring the "American Family Act of 2019" (H.R. 1560), which will significantly increase the Child Tax Credit, bringing maximum payments from $2,000 a year today to $3,000 for children between the ages of 6 and 16 and to $3,600 a year for children 5 and under.

Sources: H.R. 1560, Vox

Cost Over 10 Years: $105 billion (1 year)

Source: ITEP

Payroll Tax for Paid Leave

Gabbard is cosponsoring the “FAMILY Act” (H.R. 1185), which will fund 12 weeks of paid family leave by assessing a 0.2% tax on workers’ wages, to be split evenly between employer and employee. Both shares together would amount to less than $4 per worker per week, on average.

Sources: H.R. 1185, Vox

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

PAYS FOR

Twelve weeks of guaranteed paid leave, either for the birth of a child, illness or to take care of a relative. It would pay out 66% of workers’ salaries, including at least $250 per month to each worker, capped at $4,000 per person per month.

Sources: H.R. 1185, Vox

Kirsten Gillibrand ON TAXES AND INVESTMENTS
Gillibrand

Vote on the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA): Voted No

The TCJA (H.R. 1), also known as the Trump-GOP tax cuts, will cost $1.9 trillion over 10 years. The tax cuts heavily favor corporations and the wealthy.

Source: Roll Call Vote

TCJA Individual & Corporate Taxes

Gillibrand “would make the middle-class tax cuts from the bill permanent, given that individual tax breaks are set to expire in 2025, but would reverse Trump’s ‘massive corporate tax cut’ and ‘ensure that the tax code doesn’t reward businesses that ship jobs and resources overseas.’” The cost of the middle-class tax cut is not available, but it is likely more than $1 trillion as the overall cost of extending the TCJA tax cuts exceeds $3 trillion.

Source: Mother Jones, Washington Post

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: About $1.3 trillion from repealing the TCJA’s corporate tax-rate cut.

Source: CBO/ATF

Payroll Tax for Medicare for All

Gillibrand says she supports a 4% to 5% payroll tax on employees and employers to pay for Medicare for All. Other funding will come from taxing the wealthy and corporations and a financial transaction tax on Wall Street trades.

Source: Associated Press

Estate Tax

Gillibrand is a cosponsor of the “For the 99.8 Percent Act” (S. 309), which will restore estate-tax exemption amounts to 2009 levels and raise rates. The amount of estates exempt from taxation will fall from $11 million for individuals ($22 million for couples) under the TCJA to $3.5 million and $7 million. Tax rates will increase from the current 40% flat rate to 45% for the portion between $3.5-$10 million, 50% for the portion between $10-$50 million, 55% for the portion between $50 million and $1 billion, and 77% for the portion over $1 billion. It will also close several loopholes in the estate and gift tax. This reform will affect between 0.2% and 0.5% of estates.

Sources: Sen. Sanders, S. 309, Tax Policy Center

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: About $315 billion

Source: Washington Post

Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), Child Tax Credit (CTC)

Gillibrand is cosponsoring two bills that will expand these working family tax credits. The “Working Families Tax Relief Act of 2019” (S. 1138) will expand the EITC by 25% for families with children, makes the CTC fully refundable and adds a Young Child Tax Credit for children under 6. The bill will also substantially strengthen the EITC for childless workers. The “American Family Act of 2019” (S. 690) will significantly increase the Child Tax Credit, bringing maximum payments from $2,000 a year today to $3,000 for children between the ages of 6 and 16 and to $3,600 a year for children 5 and under.

Sources: S. 1138, CBPP, S. 690, Vox

Cost Over 10 Years: $99 billion for EITC (1 year) and $105 billion for CTC (1 year)

Source: ITEP

Payroll Tax for Paid Leave

Gillibrand is the lead sponsor of the “FAMILY Act” (S. 463), which will fund 12 weeks of paid family leave by assessing a 0.2% tax on workers’ wages, to be split evenly between employer and employee. Both shares together would amount to less than $4 per worker per week, on average.

Source: S. 463, Vox

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

PAYS FOR

Twelve weeks of guaranteed paid leave, either for the birth of a child, illness or to take care of a relative. It would pay out 66% of workers’ salaries, including at least $250 per month to each worker, capped at $4,000 per person per month.

Source: S. 463, Vox

Financial Transaction Tax

Gillibrand is cosponsoring two financial transaction tax bills. The “Wall Street Tax Act of 2019” (S. 647) will assess a 0.1% tax on stock, bond and derivatives trades -- adding $1 to the cost of a $1,000 transaction. The “Inclusive Prosperity Act of 2019” (S. 1587) would tax stock trades at a rate of 0.5%, bond trades at 0.1%, and derivatives trades at 0.005% -- adding $5 to the cost of every $1,000 in stock traded, and much less to other trades.

Sources: S. 647, S. 1587, Fact Sheet, NYT

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: $777 billion to $2.2 trillion

Sources: CBO; Pollin, Heintz and Herndon

Carbon Tax

Gillibrand is cosponsoring the American Opportunity Carbon Fee Act (S. 1128), which proposes a carbon tax of $52 per ton of carbon dioxide and adjusted by 6% annually over inflation. It is estimated to reduce the nation’s greenhouse gas emissions by 51% in ten years compared to 2005 levels.

Source: S. 1128, Sen. Whitehouse Press Release, Gillibrand Medium post

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: $2.3 trillion

Source: Gillibrand Medium post

PAYS FOR

Gillibrand’s climate action plan that will prioritize transitioning to renewable energy and energy storage technologies, help displaced workers in carbon industries transition to a green economy, support a transition to diversified, sustainable food systems, strengthen the energy grid for sustainable power, and more.

Source: Gillibrand Medium post

Renters Tax Credit

Gillibrand is cosponsoring the “Rent Relief Act of 2019” (S. 1106), which would provide a refundable tax credit to help families with high rent costs. The credit would be available to people who pay more than 30% of their gross income on rent and make up to $100,000 ($125,000 in higher housing-cost areas). The credit would be worth a certain percentage of the difference between 30% of a person’s income and up to 150% of the “fair market rent” where they live. It is estimated this plan will cost $93 billion a year and help 57 million Americans.

Sources: S. 1106, Columbia University’s Center on Poverty and Social Policy, Vox

Cost Over 10 Years: About $1 trillion

Source: Columbia University’s Center on Poverty and Social Policy

Excise Tax On Fossil Fuel Production

Gillibrand will levy an excise tax on fossil fuel production to help finance her plan to combat climate change.

Source: Gillibrand Medium post

Revenue Raised over 10 Years: $100 billion annually

Source: Gillibrand Medium post

PAYS FOR

Pays For: A “Climate Change Mitigation Trust Fund”which would be used “to lessen the effects of sea-level rise, extreme weather, and other climate-related disasters.”

Source: Gillibrand Medium post

Kamala Harris ON TAXES AND INVESTMENTS
Harris

Vote on the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA): Voted No

The TCJA (H.R. 1), also known as the Trump-GOP tax cuts, will cost $1.9 trillion over 10 years. The tax cuts heavily favor corporations and the wealthy.

Source: Roll Call Vote

Tax Cuts and Jobs Act & Working Families Tax Credits

Harris proposes to fully repeal the 2017 Trump-GOP tax law. She has said: “Get rid of the whole thing,” and replace it with her LIFT the Middle Class Act.

Source: Bloomberg

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: About $1.5 trillion

Source: JCT/ATF (TCJA 10-year tax cut lost about $1.5 trillion; $1.9 trillion counting interest)

PAYS FOR

Harris’ LIFT the Middle Class Act will provide up to $3,000 to individuals and $6,000 to married couples in refundable tax credits for low- and middle-income workers (see details below). LIFT is estimated to cost $3.1 trillion.

Source: Bloomberg, Penn Wharton Budget Model

LIFT Working Families Tax Credit

Harris is the lead sponsor of LIFT (Livable Incomes for Families Today) the Middle Class Act (S. 3712). It would offer refundable tax credits matching the first $3,000 in earnings for single taxpayers with income up to $30,000, less up to $50,000; $6,000 for married couples with income up to $60,000, less up to $100,000. Pell Grants for college would count as income, worker eligibility would not require having children at home, and benefits could be accessed monthly instead of only as a lump sum at tax filing.

Sources: S. 3712, Tax Policy Center, ITEP

Cost Over 10 Years: $3.1 trillion

Source: Penn Wharton Budget Model

Individual, Capital Gains, Corporate & Financial Transaction Taxes For “medicare For All”

Harris has proposed several options to pay for her Medicare for All plan. These include an “income-based premium” tax of 4% on households earning more than $100,000; higher taxes on the top 1%; taxing capital gains at the same rate as ordinary income; a financial transaction tax of 0.2% on stock trades, 0.1% on bond trades, and .002% on derivative transactions; and “taxing offshore corporate income at the same rate as domestic corporate income.”

Source: Kamala Harris Medium post

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

Estate Tax & Raising Teachers’ Salaries

Harris has proposed raising $315 billion to boost teacher salaries by strengthening the estate tax. Her campaign has not provided details about the tax changes, but that amount of money is what Sen. Bernie Sanders says his estate tax reforms would raise. The Sanders bill (S. 309) is based on the 2009 estate-tax levels. It will exempt from taxation estates worth up to $3.5 million for individuals ($7 million for couples). Tax rates will increase from the current 40% flat rate to 45% for the portion between $3.5-$10 million, 50% for the portion between $10-$50 million, 55% for the portion between $50 million and $1 billion, and 77% for the portion over $1 billion. This reform will affect between 0.2% and 0.5% of estates.

Sources: Vox, Sen. Sanders, S. 309, Tax Policy Center

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: $315 billion

Sources: Vox, Washington Post

PAYS FOR

Raising teacher salaries by an average of $13,500 over four years. The federal government would provide 10% of the funding in the first year and over the next three years kick in $3 for every $1 contributed by a state.

Source: Vox

Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), Child Tax Credit (CTC)

Harris is cosponsoring two bills that will expand these working family tax credits. The “Working Families Tax Relief Act of 2019” (S. 1138) will expand the EITC by 25% for families with children, makes the CTC fully refundable and adds a Young Child Tax Credit for children under 6. The bill will also substantially strengthen the EITC for childless workers. The “American Family Act of 2019” (S. 690) will significantly increase the Child Tax Credit, bringing maximum payments from $2,000 a year today to $3,000 for children between the ages of 6 and 16 and to $3,600 a year for children 5 and under.

Sources: S. 1138, CBPP, S. 690, Vox

Cost Over 10 Years: $99 billion for EITC (1 year) and $105 billion for CTC (1 year)

Source: ITEP

PAYS FOR

Pays For: Twelve weeks of guaranteed paid leave, either for the birth of a child, illness or to take care of a relative. It would pay out 66% of workers’ salaries, including at least $250 per month to each worker, capped at $4,000 per person per month.

Sources: S. 463, Vox

Payroll Tax for Paid Leave

Harris is cosponsoring the “FAMILY Act” (S. 463), which will fund 12 weeks of paid family leave by assessing a 0.2% tax on workers’ wages, to be split evenly between employer and employee. Both shares together would amount to less than $4 per worker per week, on average.

Sources: S. 463, Vox

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

PAYS FOR

Pays For: Twelve weeks of guaranteed paid leave, either for the birth of a child, illness or to take care of a relative. It would pay out 66% of workers’ salaries, including at least $250 per month to each worker, capped at $4,000 per person per month.

Sources: S. 463, Vox

Renters Tax Credit

Harris is the lead sponsor of the “Rent Relief Act of 2019” (S. 1106), which would provide a refundable tax credit to help families with high rent costs. The credit would be available to people who pay more than 30% of their gross income on rent and make up to $100,000 ($125,000 in higher housing-cost areas). The credit would be worth a certain percentage of the difference between 30% of a person’s income and up to 150% of the “fair market rent” where they live. It is estimated this plan will cost $93 billion a year and help 57 million Americans.

Sources: S. 1106, Columbia University’s Center on Poverty and Social Policy, Vox

Cost Over 10 Years: About $1 trillion

Source: Columbia University’s Center on Poverty and Social Policy

Jay Inslee ON TAXES AND INVESTMENTS
Inslee

Tax Cuts and Jobs Act

Inslee says we “need to repeal the majority of the Trump tax cuts, which went to the upper … income brackets -- rather than working people -- and did not produce jobs." Has also said, “we know, in general, we should have a fairer tax system for working people. That's why I am proposing a capital gains tax in my state, because we need a fairer system to end inequality.” … “I think looking at our [tax] rates is a rational thing to do. I haven't proposed a specific rate. But I think having a more progressive system, which you can acquire in multiple ways, one of which is to increase the marginal tax rates, I'm certainly open to that.”

Sources: NPR, PBS

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

Carbon Tax & Fossil Fuel Taxes

Inslee’s “Climate Pollution Fee” will levy a tax on greenhouse gasses like carbon, but also “provide a fee for methane, F-gases, and other greenhouse gas emissions to recognize the differential heat trapping potential of these ‘super-pollutants.’” Inslee says he will “[put] forward legislation to end wasteful tax subsidies enjoyed by oil, gas and coal companies” and “[reinstate, enforce and mandate] taxes and fees on fossil fuel companies and other polluters to hold them accountable for the damage they have caused and the necessary costs of remediation, site cleanup, worker health impacts, oil spills and more.”

Sources: NYT, PBS, Inslee’s An Evergreen Economy for America

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

PAYS FOR

Inslee will spend $300 billion a year, or $3 trillion over 10 years, in new federal investments to “build a clean energy economy.” It is not clear if the Climate Pollution Fee will pay for all of that. It will be used to “provide dedicated support for frontline and low-income communities in addressing the impacts of climate disasters, and funding environmental quality protections and economic development.”

Sources: Inslee’s An Evergreen Economy for America Plan, Inslee’s Freedom from Fossil Fuels Plan

Amy Klobuchar ON TAXES AND INVESTMENTS
Klobuchar

Vote on the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA): Voted No

The TCJA (H.R. 1), also known as the Trump-GOP tax cuts, will cost $1.9 trillion over 10 years. The tax cuts heavily favor corporations and the wealthy.

Source: Roll Call Vote

TCJA, Individual Taxes, Capital Gains Taxes & Fossil Fuel Tax Breaks

Klobuchar says that to pay for certain priorities and reduce the federal debt she will “repeal the regressive portions of 2017 Republican tax reform, equalize tax rates for capital gains and ordinary income, put the Buffet rule in place [which will establish a minimum tax rate of 30% on individuals making over $1 million], and close the carried interest and big oil loopholes.”

Source: Amy’s First 100 Days

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

PAYS FOR

Klobuchar’s priorities include investing in quality childcare; providing paid family leave; supporting small business owners and entrepreneurs; establishing portable, worker-owned UP Accounts for retirement savings; allowing students to refinance their loans at lower interest rates, providing tuition-free community college and technical certifications, and expanding Pell Grant eligibility and award amounts; and reducing the federal debt.

Source: Amy’s First 100 Days

Corporate Taxes & Fee on Big Banks to Pay for Infrastructure

Klobuchar “will make a number of corporate tax reforms including adjusting the corporate tax rate to 25% [up from 21%], closing loopholes that encourage U.S. companies to move jobs and operations overseas, establishing a financial risk fee on our largest banks, and increasing efforts for tax enforcement.”

Source: Amy’s Plan to Build America’s Infrastructure

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: $359 billion from corporate tax increase

Source: CBO/ATF

PAYS FOR

Klobuchar’s infrastructure plan, which includes $650 billion in federal funding for transportation, housing, schools, rural broadband, and green energy.

Source: Amy’s Plan to Build America’s Infrastructure

TCJA and Corporate Taxes

Klobuchar is the lead sponsor of the “Removing Incentives for Offshoring Act of 2018” (S. 3674). It will ensure that U.S. companies pay the full domestic tax rate on any earnings they ascribe to tax havens, thereby preventing the shifting of U.S. profits to low- or zero-tax countries. It will also eliminate a U.S. corporation’s “ability to deduct 10 percent of their tangible assets before the tax rate on foreign income applies,” which will end a tax incentive to shift jobs and operations offshore.

Sources: S. 3674, Klobuchar Press Release

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

Carried Interest Loophole & Opioid Fee to Address Addiction

Klobuchar wants to end the loophole that allows wealthy investment managers of private equity, real estate and hedge funds to pay the 20% capital-gains tax rate on “carried interest,” which are earnings tied to a percentage of the fund’s profits. Because this income from managing other people’s money is employment income, closing the loophole would result in it being taxed at regular income tax rates, which is 37% at the top. Klobuchar will also assess a 2 cents per milligram fee or tax on active opioid ingredients in a prescription pain pill paid by the manufacturer or importer.

Source: NYT, ATF

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: $14 billion (carried interest only)

Source: CBO

PAYS FOR

Investments to improve access and treatment for substance use and mental health, as well as increased funding for related research.

Source: Amy’s Plan to Combat Addiction and Prioritize Mental Health

Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), Child Tax Credit (CTC)

Klobuchar is cosponsoring two bills that will expand these working family tax credits. The “Working Families Tax Relief Act of 2019” (S. 1138) will expand the EITC by 25% for families with children, makes the CTC fully refundable and adds a Young Child Tax Credit for children under 6. The bill will also substantially strengthen the EITC for childless workers. The “American Family Act of 2019” (S. 690) will significantly increase the Child Tax Credit, bringing maximum payments from $2,000 a year today to $3,000 for children between the ages of 6 and 16 and to $3,600 a year for children 5 and under.

Sources: S. 1138, CBPP, S. 690, Vox

Cost Over 10 Years: $99 billion for EITC (1 year) and $105 billion for CTC (1 year)

Source: ITEP

Payroll Tax for Paid Leave

Klobuchar is cosponsoring the “FAMILY Act” (S. 463), which will fund 12 weeks of paid family leave by assessing a 0.2% tax on workers’ wages, to be split evenly between employer and employee. Both shares together would amount to less than $4 per worker per week, on average.

Source: S. 463, Vox

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

PAYS FOR

Twelve weeks of guaranteed paid leave, either for the birth of a child, illness or to take care of a relative. It would pay out 66% of workers’ salaries, including at least $250 per month to each worker, capped at $4,000 per person per month.

Source: S. 463, Vox

Carbon Tax

Klobuchar is “open” to a carbon tax, but “would not support one that increased prices for lower- and middle-income Americans.”
Source: NYT

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

Seth Moulton ON TAXES AND INVESTMENTS
Moulton

Vote on the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA): Voted No

The TCJA (H.R. 1), also known as the Trump-GOP tax cuts, will cost $1.9 trillion over 10 years. The tax cuts heavily favor corporations and the wealthy.

Source: Roll Call Vote

Vote to Make the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act Permanent: Did Not Vote

This legislation (H.R. 6760) would have made the Trump-GOP tax cuts that affect individuals permanent; currently they expire at the end of 2025. Those tax cuts would have heavily favored the wealthy.

Source: Roll Call Vote

Corporate Taxes & Business Taxes

Moulton will raise the U.S. corporate income tax rate from 21% to 25%; the rate was 35% before the TCJA became law. Moulton will end a tax break created under the TCJA that allows owners of most pass-through businesses to exclude 20% of their business income from taxation—effectively lowering the top personal income tax rate to as low as 29.6%, from 37%. Three-fifths of the value of this tax break will go to the richest 1% of business owners by 2024, such as real estate moguls like Trump.

Source: Seth Moulton Democratic Tax Reform, CBPP

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: $359 billion in corporate taxes; $342 billion in business taxes

Sources: JCT, ITEP

PAYS FOR

Klobuchar’s priorities include investing in quality childcare; providing paid family leave; supporting small business owners and entrepreneurs; establishing portable, worker-owned UP Accounts for retirement savings; allowing students to refinance their loans at lower interest rates, providing tuition-free community college and technical certifications, and expanding Pell Grant eligibility and award amounts; and reducing the federal debt.

Source: Amy’s First 100 Days

Capital Gains Taxes & Carried Interest Loophole

Moulton will close all “loopholes that allow the wealthy to have a lower tax burden than working families.” He will “eliminate the rate difference between long term capital gains and income taxes,” thereby taxing income from investments equal to income from wages and salaries. Moulton will also close the carried interest loophole, which allows partners at private equity firms and hedge funds to pay the lower capital gains tax rate rather than the higher ordinary income tax rate.

Source: Seth Moulton Democratic Tax Reform

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Up to $1.5 trillion from capital gains; $12 billion from carried interest

Sources: ITEP, JCT

PAYS FOR

Klobuchar’s infrastructure plan, which includes $650 billion in federal funding for transportation, housing, schools, rural broadband, and green energy.

Source: Amy’s Plan to Build America’s Infrastructure

Estate Tax

Moulton will return the threshold at which estate taxes are assessed to the 2009 levels of $3.5 million for an individual and $7 million for couples. This level would affect fewer than 5 out of every 1,000 estates. The plan also eliminates step-up in basis that allows taxpayers to avoid paying any taxes on the growth in value of assets such as stocks if they are passed on to heirs of estates before they are sold.

Source: Seth Moulton Democratic Tax Reform, Tax Policy Center

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

Tax Enforcement

Moulton will spend $2 billion a year over 10 years to empower the IRS to hire more auditors and reclaim some of the $500 billion in annual revenue lost to tax cheats.

Source: Seth Moulton Democratic Tax Reform

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: $35 billion

Source: CBO

PAYS FOR

Investments to improve access and treatment for substance use and mental health, as well as increased funding for related research.

Source: Amy’s Plan to Combat Addiction and Prioritize Mental Health

Child Tax Credit (CTC)

Moulton is a cosponsor of the “American Family Act of 2019” (H.R. 1560), which will significantly increase the Child Tax Credit, bringing maximum payments from $2,000 a year today to $3,000 for children between the ages of 6 and 16 and to $3,600 a year for children 5 and under.

Sources: H.R. 1560, Vox

Cost Over 10 Years: $105 billion (1 year)

Source: ITEP

Payroll Tax for Paid Leave

Moulton is a cosponsor of the “FAMILY Act” (H.R. 1185), which will fund 12 weeks of paid family leave by assessing a 0.2% tax on workers’ wages, to be split evenly between employer and employee. Both shares together would amount to less than $4 per worker per week, on average.

Sources: H.R. 1185, Vox

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

PAYS FOR

Twelve weeks of guaranteed paid leave, either for the birth of a child, illness or to take care of a relative. It would pay out 66% of workers’ salaries, including at least $250 per month to each worker, capped at $4,000 per person per month.

Sources: H.R. 1185, Vox

Wayne Messam ON TAXES AND INVESTMENTS
Messam

Corporate Taxes

Messam says he wants to roll back “some of the tax rates these corporations have been able to enjoy, cut[ting] off some of the tax loopholes that wealthy Americans are able to capitalize on, that is additional revenue that could be used to do things like forgiving student loan debt and other investments in this country that could spark economic activity.”

Source: Independent Journal Review

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

Payroll Tax for College Aid

Messam says “we will ask our employers to pay a small payroll tax that will go toward the federal government, … which would be used to help offset the cost of higher education, whether it’s for grants to colleges and universities, whether it’s through the Pell Grant system, or merit-based process where individuals … [get help] to pay their college tuition or pay off any student loans that they might have.

Source: Independent Journal Review

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

Beto O'Rourke ON TAXES AND INVESTMENTS
O'Rourke

Vote on the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA): Voted No

The TCJA (H.R. 1), also known as the Trump-GOP tax cuts, will cost $1.9 trillion over 10 years. The tax cuts heavily favor corporations and the wealthy.

Source: Roll Call Vote

Vote to Make the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act Permanent: Voted No

This legislation (H.R. 6760) would have made the Trump-GOP tax cuts that affect individuals permanent; currently they expire at the end of 2025. Those tax cuts would have heavily favored the wealthy.

Source: Roll Call Vote

Wealth Tax

O’Rourke says he supports a wealth tax, but has provided no details.

Source: Bloomberg

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

TCJA Repeal, Individual & Corporate Taxes

O’Rourke says he will “roll back the worst elements of the Trump tax cuts.” That includes raising the top individual tax tax rate to at least 39% (from the current 37%) and raising the corporate tax rate to 28% (from the current 21%).

Source: CNBC

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: $675 billion by raising corporate tax rate

Source: CBO/JCT/ATF (pp. 39-40)

Capital Gains Taxes

O’Rourke will tax capital gains from investment income at the same rate as ordinary income from salaries and wages. He will also end the stepped-up basis loophole, which allows taxpayers to avoid paying any taxes on the growth in value of assets such as stocks if they are passed on to heirs of estates before they are sold.

Source: CNBC

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

Individual Taxes

O’Rourke will implement a War Tax at the start of every “newly authorized war” that would levy a progressive annual tax on the adjusted gross income (AGI) of households without military members or veterans. The tax would start at $25 for households with an AGI of less than $30,000 per year and would have a top rate of $1,000 for households earning more than $200,000.

Source: Beto’s Caring For Our Nation’s Veterans, Politico

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

PAYS FOR

The war tax would be used to fund services for future veterans of the new war such as “veterans’ hospital care and medical services; disability compensation; and any other programs directly related to the care of veterans.”

Source: Beto’s Caring For Our Nation’s Veterans

Corporate, Individual & Fossil Fuel Taxes to Address Climate Change

O’Rourke says he will make “structural changes to the tax code to ensure corporations and the wealthiest among us pay their fair share and that we finally end the tens of billions of dollars of tax breaks currently given to fossil fuel companies."

Source: O’Rourke’s Climate Change Proposal

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: $1.5 trillion

Source: O’Rourke’s Climate Change Proposal

PAYS FOR

A $1.5 trillion federal investment in green infrastructure, research and climate change adaptation that aims to achieve net-zero emissions by 2050.

Source: O’Rourke’s Climate Change Proposal

Carbon Tax

O’Rourke says he supports a carbon tax as one way of “pricing carbon into the market” but has provided no details.

Source: NYT

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

Tim Ryan ON TAXES AND INVESTMENTS
Ryan

Vote on the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA): Voted No

The TCJA (H.R. 1), also known as the Trump-GOP tax cuts, will cost $1.9 trillion over 10 years. The tax cuts heavily favor corporations and the wealthy.

Source: Roll Call Vote

Vote to Make the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act Permanent: Voted No

This legislation (H.R. 6760) would have made the Trump-GOP tax cuts that affect individuals permanent; currently they expire at the end of 2025. Those tax cuts would have heavily favored the wealthy.

Source: Roll Call Vote

Individual, Capital Gains & Financial Transaction Taxes for Healthcare

Ryan was a cosponsor in 2017 of the “Expanded & Improved Medicare For All Act” (H.R. 676), which would increase income taxes on the wealthiest 5%, enact a modest and progressive payroll tax and self-employment tax, institute a modest tax on unearned income, and place a small tax on stock and bond transactions.

Source: H.R. 676

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

Wealth Tax

Ryan will increase income tax rates on the wealthiest people and says he supports Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s “Ultra-Millionaires Tax.” It would levy a 2% annual tax on household net worth over $50 million, and a 3% tax on the portion over $1 billion and is estimated to raise $2.75 trillion.

Sources: The Young Turks (starts at 5:50), Saez and Zucman

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

Corporate Taxes

Ryan will increase the corporate tax rate to the “higher 20s” but provide tax breaks for companies that have positive social or environmental impact.

Source: The Young Turks (starts at 9:27)

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

Financial Transaction Tax

“I do support some kind of [financial] transaction tax.”

Source: CNN

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

PAYS FOR

The war tax would be used to fund services for future veterans of the new war such as “veterans’ hospital care and medical services; disability compensation; and any other programs directly related to the care of veterans.”

Source: Beto’s Caring For Our Nation’s Veterans

Child Tax Credit (CTC)

Ryan is a cosponsor of the “American Family Act of 2019” (H.R. 1560), which will significantly increase the Child Tax Credit, bringing maximum payments from $2,000 a year today to $3,000 for children between the ages of 6 and 16 and to $3,600 a year for children 5 and under.

Sources: H.R. 1560, Vox

Cost Over 10 Years: $105 billion (1 year)

Source: ITEP

Payroll Tax for Paid Leave

Ryan is a cosponsor of the “FAMILY Act” (H.R. 1185), which will fund 12 weeks of paid family leave by assessing a 0.2% tax on workers’ wages, to be split evenly between employer and employee. Both shares together would amount to less than $4 per worker per week, on average.

Sources: H.R. 1185, Vox

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

PAYS FOR

Pays For: Twelve weeks of guaranteed paid leave, either for the birth of a child, illness or to take care of a relative. It would pay out 66% of workers’ salaries, including at least $250 per month to each worker, capped at $4,000 per person per month.

Sources: H.R. 1185, Vox

Bernie Sanders ON TAXES AND INVESTMENTS
Sanders

Vote on the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA): Voted No

The TCJA (H.R. 1), also known as the Trump-GOP tax cuts, will cost $1.9 trillion over 10 years. The tax cuts heavily favor corporations and the wealthy.

Source: Roll Call Vote

Individual, Payroll, Capital Gains, Wealth & Corporate Taxes For Medicare For All

To help finance his Medicare for All plan Sanders will require employees to pay a 4% income-based premium (exempting the first $29,000); require employers to pay a 7.5% premium (exempting the first $2 million in payroll); raise the income tax rate to 70% on the portion of individual income above $10 million; limit tax deductions for filers in the top tax bracket; raise the current 20% top rate on long-term capital gains and dividend income to match the 37% rate on wages and salaries; make the estate tax more progressive; establish a tax on “extreme wealth”; impose a fee on large financial institutions; and repeal corporate accounting gimmicks.

Source: Sen. Sanders

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

Estate tax

Sanders is the lead sponsor of the "For the 99.8 Percent Act" (S. 309), which will restore estate-tax exemption amounts to 2009 levels and raise rates. The amount of estates exempt from taxation will fall from $11 million for individuals ($22 million for couples) under the TCJA to $3.5 million and $7 million. Tax rates will increase from the current 40% flat rate to 45% for the portion between $3.5-$10 million, 50% for the portion between $10-$50 million, 55% for the portion between $50 million and $1 billion, and 77% for the portion over $1 billion. It will also closes several loopholes in the estate and gift tax. This reform will affect between 0.2% and 0.5% of estates.

Sources: Sen. Sanders, S. 309, Tax Policy Center

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: About $315 billion

Source: Washington Post

Corporate Taxes

Sanders is the lead sponsor of the "Corporate Tax Dodging Prevention Act of 2017" (S. 586), which would require companies to pay the same tax rate on domestic and foreign income, thus ending the lower tax rate for foreign income under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.

Source: S. 586, Sen. Sanders

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

Financial Transaction Tax to Cancel Student Debt & for "Free College"

Sanders is the lead sponsor of the "Inclusive Prosperity Act of 2019" (S. 1587), which would tax Wall Street stock trades at a rate of 0.5%, bond trades at 0.1%, and derivatives trades at 0.005% -- adding $5 to the cost of every $1,000 in stock traded, much less to other trades.

Sources: S. 1587, Sen. Sanders

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Up to $2.2 trillion

Source: Pollin, Heintz and Herndon

PAYS FOR

Eliminating all student debt held by 45 million Americans, which is estimated to cost $1.6 trillion, and providing a tuition-free education to public universities, community colleges and trade schools.

Source: Washington Post

Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), Child Tax Credit (CTC)

Sanders is cosponsoring two bills that will expand these working family tax credits. The “Working Families Tax Relief Act of 2019” (S. 1138) will expand the EITC by 25% for families with children, makes the CTC fully refundable and adds a Young Child Tax Credit for children under 6. The bill will also substantially strengthen the EITC for childless workers. The “American Family Act of 2019” (S. 690) will significantly increase the Child Tax Credit, bringing maximum payments from $2,000 a year today to $3,000 for children between the ages of 6 and 16 and to $3,600 a year for children 5 and under.

Sources: S. 1138, CBPP, S. 690, Vox

Cost Over 10 Years: $99 billion for EITC (1 year) and $105 billion for CTC (1 year)

Source: ITEP

Payroll Tax for Paid Leave

Sanders is cosponsoring the “FAMILY Act” (S. 463), which will fund 12 weeks of paid family leave by assessing a 0.2% tax on workers’ wages, to be split evenly between employer and employee. Both shares together would amount to less than $4 per worker per week, on average.

Source: S. 463, Vox

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

PAYS FOR

Twelve weeks of guaranteed paid leave, either for the birth of a child, illness or to take care of a relative. It would pay out 66% of workers’ salaries, including at least $250 per month to each worker, capped at $4,000 per person per month.

Source: S. 463, Vox

Tom Steyer ON TAXES AND INVESTMENTS
Steyer

Tax Cuts And Jobs Act

Steyer ran ads in opposition to the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act in November 2017, which said: “They won’t tell you that their so-called tax reform plan is really for the wealthy and big corporations while hurting the middle class. It blows up the deficit, and that means fewer investments in education, healthcare and job creation.”

Source: Need to Impeach

Wealth Tax For Investments

“Congress should institute a new type of tax altogether: a 1 percent annual wealth tax on the top .1 percent of Americans. Here’s what that would look like. If you are worth more than $20 million, you'll pay a single penny on every dollar you have above that level. No deductions, no exemptions, no loopholes at all. Every .1 percenter pays.” Steyer suggests the revenue raised from a wealth tax could be used to invest in education, healthcare, or retirement security.

Source: USA Today op-ed

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: $1.3 trillion

Source: ITEP

Estate Tax

Steyer calls for “raising the estate tax and closing trust fund loopholes” the wealthy use to evade paying the estate tax, but he has not provided more details.

Source: USA Today op-ed

Elizabeth Warren ON TAXES AND INVESTMENTS
Warren

Vote on the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA): Voted No

The TCJA (H.R. 1), also known as the Trump-GOP tax cuts, will cost $1.9 trillion over 10 years. The tax cuts heavily favor corporations and the wealthy.

Source: Roll Call Vote

Wealth Tax to Cancel Student Debt, for "Free College" & Childcare

Warren proposes an "Ultra-Millionaires Tax," which will levy a 2% annual tax on household net worth over $50 million and a 3% tax on the portion over $1 billion. It is estimated to affect 75,000 households, or the richest 0.1%.

Source: Sen. Warren

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: $2.75 trillion
Source: Saez and Zucman

PAYS FOR

Among the initiatives proposed are: $1.25 trillion to cancel student debt ($640 billion) and fund a “Universal Free College” program; $700 billion to create a universal child care program; $100 billion to fight the opioid epidemic; $32 billion to improve public lands and national parks; and $15 billion to offer Puerto Rican debt relief.

Source: Sen. Warren, Washington Post, Bloomberg News

Corporate Taxes to Pay for Green Manufacturing

Warren proposes three significant changes in corporate taxes that would raise about $1.25 trillion. Her "Real Corporate Profits Tax” will levy a 7% surtax on a company’s global corporate profits of more than $100 million. This is in addition to current U.S. tax obligations. Warren says it will affect 1,200 firms. She proposes to close TCJA corporate tax loopholes that incentivize offshoring, such as repealing the lowering of the corporate tax rate for profits earned offshore. She will also end federal tax subsidies for the oil and gas industries.

Sources: Sen. Warren, Moody's Analytics

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: $1.25 trillion: $1.05 trillion from the 7% surtax, $150 billion from higher taxes on offshore profits, and $100 billion from ending fossil fuel subsidies.
Sources: Saez and Zucman, Moody's Analytics

PAYS FOR

Most of Warren’s Green Manufacturing Plan for America, which is a $2 trillion federal investment in clean energy research, manufacturing and exporting.

Source: Sen. Warren

Estate Tax for Affordable Housing

Warren has introduced the has "American Housing and Economic Mobility Act of 2019" (S. 3503), which will restore estate-tax exemption amounts to 2009 levels and raise rates. The amount of estates exempt from taxation will fall from $11 million for individuals ($22 million for couples) under the TCJA to $3.5 million and $7 million. Tax rates will increase from the current 40% flat rate to 55% for the portion between $3.5-$13 million and 60% for the portion between $13-$93 million. It will also levy a 10% surtax on the portion of estates over $1 billion—effectively creating a 75% rate. This reform will affect 0.5% of estates.

Sources: S. 3503, Moody's Analytics, Tax Policy Center

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: $400 billion

Source: Moody's Analytics

PAYS FOR

"American Housing and Economic Mobility Act of 2019" (S. 3503), which will help control the cost of renting or buying a home by leveraging federal funding to build up to 3.2 million new housing units, bringing down rents by 10% for lower-income and middle-class families and creating 1.5 million new jobs.

Sources: Sen. Warren, Moody's Analytics

Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), Child Tax Credit (CTC)

Warren is cosponsoring two bills that will expand these working family tax credits. The “Working Families Tax Relief Act of 2019” (S. 1138) will expand the EITC by 25% for families with children, makes the CTC fully refundable and adds a Young Child Tax Credit for children under 6. The bill will also substantially strengthen the EITC for childless workers. The “American Family Act of 2019” (S. 690) will significantly increase the Child Tax Credit, bringing maximum payments from $2,000 a year today to $3,000 for children between the ages of 6 and 16 and to $3,600 a year for children 5 and under.

Sources: S. 1138, CBPP, S. 690, Vox

Cost Over 10 Years: $99 billion for EITC (1 year) and $105 billion for CTC (1 year)
Source: ITEP

Payroll Tax for Paid Leave

Warren is cosponsoring the “FAMILY Act” (S. 463), which will fund 12 weeks of paid family leave by assessing a 0.2% tax on workers’ wages, to be split evenly between employer and employee. Both shares together would amount to less than $4 per worker per week, on average.

Source: S. 463, Vox

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

PAYS FOR

Twelve weeks of guaranteed paid leave, either for the birth of a child, illness or to take care of a relative. It would pay out 66% of workers’ salaries, including at least $250 per month to each worker, capped at $4,000 per person per month.

Source: S. 463, Vox

Marianne Williamson ON TAXES AND INVESTMENTS
Williamson

TCJA Repeal, Wealth Tax & Medicare for All

Williamson will “repeal the 2017 $2 trillion tax cut” … “but would put back in the middle class tax cut, and close a lot of those corporate loopholes.” She also doesn’t “have a problem with [Sen.] Warren’s wealth tax proposal.”

Source: Yahoo Finance (starts at 2:40)

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

PAYS FOR

Among the initiatives proposed are: $1.25 trillion to cancel student debt ($640 billion) and fund a “Universal Free College” program; $700 billion to create a universal child care program; $100 billion to fight the opioid epidemic; $32 billion to improve public lands and national parks; and $15 billion to offer Puerto Rican debt relief.

Source: Sen. Warren, Washington Post, Bloomberg News

Carbon Tax

Williamson supports a broad-based carbon tax at no more than $60 per ton of CO2. “Funds should be used to retire inefficient equipment, to incentivize zero-carbon-producing technologies and to spur a green economy.”

Source: NYT

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

PAYS FOR

Most of Warren’s Green Manufacturing Plan for America, which is a $2 trillion federal investment in clean energy research, manufacturing and exporting.

Source: Sen. Warren

Child Tax Credit (CTC)

Williamson “supports a new child care tax credit worth up to $14,000 per child, which would be paid directly to child care providers on a monthly basis.”

Source: Vox

Cost Over 10 Years: Not Available

PAYS FOR

"American Housing and Economic Mobility Act of 2019" (S. 3503), which will help control the cost of renting or buying a home by leveraging federal funding to build up to 3.2 million new housing units, bringing down rents by 10% for lower-income and middle-class families and creating 1.5 million new jobs.

Sources: Sen. Warren, Moody's Analytics

Andrew Yang ON TAXES AND INVESTMENTS
Yang

Social Security Tax, Financial Transaction Tax, Capital Gains Taxes

Yang favors “removing the Social Security cap” but has not specified at what level. Currently, earnings above $132,900 are not subject to the 6.2% tax paid by both the employee and the employer. He will also implement a financial transactions tax, but has not specified the level, and supports “ending the favorable tax treatment for capital gains/carried interest” to curb financial speculation.

Source: Yang 2020, SHRM

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

PAYS FOR

Yang’s “Freedom Dividend,” which would provide a universal basic income (UBI) of $12,000 per year to every U.S. citizen over the age of 18.

Source: Yang 2020

Value-Added Tax (VAT) to Fund Universal Basic Income (UBI)

Yang will implement a valued-added tax (VAT) of 10%. A VAT is a consumption tax placed on the purchase of a product and service at each stage of development, from production to the point of sale. The amount charged is less any costs of production that have already been taxed.

Source: Yang 2020, Investopedia

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: $800 billion over an unspecified time period per Yang.

Source: Yang 2020

PAYS FOR

Yang’s “Freedom Dividend,” which would provide a universal basic income of $12,000 per year to every U.S. citizen over the age of 18.

Source: Yang 2020

Carbon Tax to Fund UBI & Renewable Energy Research/Investment

Yang is “in favor of a carbon fee and dividend system, taxing carbon at $40 per ton and increasing over time.”

Source: NYT

Revenue Raised Over 10 Years: Not Available

PAYS FOR

Half of the carbon tax revenue would fund Yang's UBI and the other half would be invested in “research and investment into renewable energy, sustainable agriculture, infrastructure improvements and similar areas.”

Source: NYT

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